Delhi 6 – Food Delivery Service – Rajeev Gulati’s Experience

Delhi 6 is a food delivery service – as per their Facebook page they claim to bring to your table the royal recipes of Mughals and homemade delicacies of Muslim families from the walled city. Rajeev Gulati shares his experience of the same in this post. Kindly visit their Facebook page for contact and other details. 

I had been hearing lot many reviews about food from Delhi-6 by Shibli Anisand was keen on tasting the same but was not getting an opportunity somehow. Thanks to our friend Vikrant Pawa Ji who invited me over a dinner with delicious food from Delhi-6. Here is my food experience as per individual dish :-
Shaami Kabab – Medium sized Shaami Kababs deep fried to perfection. It was a pleasant surprise to feel the strands of pure mutton in each bite instead of the Shaami made from excessive pounded mutton mixed with lot of Channa Daal usually available at most of new places. I could feel the taste of pure mutton with mild spices and less chilly. Very soft and very good.
Chicken Gola Kabab – These were much like Sootli Kababs but were made with chicken. Delicate Seekh Kababs made with very fine chicken mince (rather pounded) infused with cinnamon and green chilly paste. These were so delicate that had to be wrapped with a thread so that they do not fall off the skewers while cooking. The thread was removed before serving and the taste was great. The kababs were very tender. Green chilly taste was very evident and was complimenting the otherwise bland basic taste of chicken.
Hari Mirchi Keema – Actually it had whole Green & Red chilly along with black pepper corns…. So technically should well be called “Saari Mirchiyon Ka Keema”. I was too pleased to see hand pounded coarse mutton instead of the usually available machine made Keema which almost fails to give you a taste of mutton and tastes more like Soya granules. Presence of three types of chilly was giving a wholesome experience to my taste buds allover, at the tip, middle and end of my tongue. Keema was tender and had adequate pieces of Mutton Nalli (Shanks) added to it to give it the flavors released from bone. Perfect dish.
Fish Curry – I am not a fish curry eater and I prefer my fish to be fried or grilled or steamed but I can assure you that this was made flawlessly. Fish used was Singhara and it was a perfect balance of firmness and tenderness. Firm enough to stay the prices intact and tender enough to melt in mouth. It was cooked in korma style gravy and the spices were kept minimum to compliment the delicate taste of fish.
Shab Degh – This was the dish I was keenly looking for as I was eating it for the first time. It’s a secret art to make a Shab Degh and there not many people, who have the expertise to make it. It’s a korma style dish made of Mutton Kofta balls and medium sized whole Shalgam (Turnips) and it is cooked on DUM. The art is to cook it in such a way as to keep the mutton soft and at the same time to maintain the delicate Shalgam firm enough to retain it’s texture. The spices were kept to minimum to compliment the taste of main ingredients. I cannot compare this dish with any other place as I had it for the first time. Yet I was convinced with their art of cooking this delicate dish.
Mutton Biryani – Long rice grains with each grain separated, partially colored, and with added fragrances, delicate spices and Mutton pieces just rightly cooked. A perfect Biryani. However I expect a little more in the form of rich use of Saffron & Cardamom and lesser use of ghee. A perfect Biryani it was otherwise but still has scope for betterment. I would suggest them to make to varieties of Biryani as the one they are making right now and another more similar to the one served at Dumpukht which is called a Parda Biryani and has only Saffron used as color with very mild fragrant spices and almost no ghee at all. I like my Biryani to be lighter and milder with meat pieces more tender. But then again, that’s my personal choice and that does not takes away the credit of this dish, which was liked by all.
Sheermal, Ghee Chini Roti & Roomali Roti – All three types of breads were made to perfection and I was so very full by this time that I could only taste a piece from all three.
Written by Rajeev Gulati

The Carnivore Carnival – Ramzan Walk in Old Delhi

If you have been born and brought up in Delhi, chances are that the memories of evenings spent with family at the melas or carnivals of the “pre-mall” days, occupy a very important part of your childhood nostalgia. Remember the old feeling when your feet are screaming for a break from all the walking – but instead your eyes, filled with excitement, refuse to listen, and keep on pulling you towards the next attraction?? That was exactly how I was feeling today at Jama Masjid, and all the joy-rides were for my taste-buds.
Our gang of FED’s got together at the Chawri Bazaar metro station, and we started walking through the small eateries mainly catering to the Chawri Bazaar businessmen and the local residents. Until we reached the Jama Masjid area, the fare was only vegetarian, and rightly so, because had we gone straight to the other part, our vegetarian friends would have run away at the very beginning.
My narration starts forms the part 2 of our FED walk, or as I like to call it “The Carnivore Carnival”.
 
Ramzan or Ramadan is the Islamic month of fasting, during which, participating Muslims strictly refrain from eating food and even water during the daylight hours. It is only after sunset that they are allowed to take their first sip of water of the day. The fast breaking meal of the day is known as Iftar, which traditionally starts with the ceremonial eating of three dates, just as Prophet Muhammad used to do.
We were at the area called Matia Mahal which is the lane leading in towards the market opposite gate no: 1 of the Jama Masjid entrance. And since It is the holy month of Ramzan, we were there to join in on the celebrations. When we entered the lane, we couldn’t help being overwhelmed by the festive energy of the place. The joyful spirit instantly overpowers as you are drawn into the labyrinth of lights, colors, and best of all the succulent aroma of wonderful food.
Our first halt was at a biryani vendor, he had two different types of biryanis, the Chicken and beef (or as they called it “Bade ki Biryani”). Both of them tasted nice as they were cooked very well. But I must admit that this guy’s biryani was not the best one of the evening.
Twenty steps further into the lane was a grilled chicken outlet, I think its name was Aslam Chicken Corner. This guy is basically sitting on the street with a huge tawa, at-least 3 ft in diameter, full of marinated chicken breast pieces, and a small grill besides it. The Chicken was juicy and simply amazing, even though it was drenched in yellow butter, the taste was perfectly balanced with all the spices used in marinating it. At Rs. 65 for a skewer with 7 pieces it was just awesome.

 

Here, I met a few local youth, (who for some reason were convinced that I was from London and not Delhi ??) I asked one of them about his favorite food in the lane and he recommended a Chicken Biryani place and pointed out to the outlet. I’m glad I followed the dude’s advice.
The biryani here was out-standing, much better than the earlier place, it was cooked to perfection with each individual strand perfectly separated, and the aroma was a flawless melody of spices. The quality of rice they used was nothing like what I have ever seen before, each grain was at least half an inch long. The guy sitting at the Deg (the biryani vessel) told me that only a very special type of rice will make the biryani taste this good. This guy even had us try some of his Korma which was again great. I love mixing a little korma with my biryani.
 Also, adjoining this place was an outlet making Rotis and Sheermals. We were tempted to try the sheermal and they were superb. It is a flat bread which is mildly sweet and only slightly glazed and cooked in a tandoor. They too would have been a perfect accompaniment with the Korma.
All the food had me craving for a nice cool drink, and at that moment had I wished for something else, it would definitely have been granted. Just a couple of shops down the lane I saw something spectacular. This shop had a giant soda vending machine which had every flavor imaginable on offer. They had at least 15 different varieties of soda ranging from Leeche to Mango, Blueberry to Strawberry, you name it, and the taste was surprisingly commendable. We guys went crazy with delight. Seriously, I wasn’t kidding about the Mela part.
Up next I met the happiest food vendor I’ve seen in my whole life. This guy (who by the way had a striking resemblance with the actor Randeep Hooda.. see pic) was just so jubilant. He served us with an energy that was both entertaining and inspiring with a smile as big as the old city, and this was besides the fact that he was super-busy. He was selling this unique sharbat made with water, milk, Roohafza plus little chunks of watermelon added in the mix. It was only mildly sweet, delicious and totally refreshing.
Right next to this jolly fellow was a guy selling different curries out of a cart, now, how often do you get to see stuff like that? We asked him to give us a plate each of all his non-veg preparations. He set up a small table for us and sent us Hari Mirch Keema, Magaz (Brain) Curry, Mutton Korma, Dal Meat and Bade Ka Salan. We all had our favorites, mine was the Korma but the Magaz was the first one to be wiped off.

You have to pardon me for not giving you any names as these places are known more by their food and location. Most of them have been sitting at the same place selling the same food for decades without choosing any name for their outlet. In order to find them all you need to do is start walking into the lane and go on exploring.

To finish off, we decided to culminate the evening at the outlet which has made the Jama Masjid area food famous all over the world, we ended up at Karim’s. This place is an institution in itself. To reach there we had to walk back to the entrance of the lane where the very first Karim’s is located. It opened originally in the year 1918 (I think) and they have been putting smiles of people’s faces ever since.

We are all too familiar with Karim’s food, as any foodie worth his salt would be, so we just ordered a few of our favorites. In fact, I doubt if the majority of their visitors even look at their Menu card before ordering.

We had their Burra Kebabs, Nihari, Keema and Seekh Kababs. I even wanted to have the Raan which is the roasted whole leg of the goat but it was sold out, sadly.

The Burra is their most famous and popular preparation. It is made of pieces of goat meat marinated in their secret mix of spices and then slow cooked in the tandoor. The meat is soft and it melts in the mouth within a few bites, perfect. I could eat it all day.

The Nihari is again a goat meat preparation and is more popular during Ramzan. The gravy is very rich and creamy, again with a lot of spices added to create Magic. We finished off with the famous Phirni which is their version of kheer.

The food is no doubt very heavy with all the spices and Ghee, but, I feel, that is the essence of Mughlai food. After eating so much I’m glad I walked all the way back till New Delhi railway station, where I had parked.

When it comes to working with red meat, the Muslim chefs have definitely written the book on the subject. It will always be their art. I just hope their younger generation takes on the reins so we can continue savoring the delights as their art of cooking is passed on from generation to generation.
One last word on the prices. Karim’s by all standards is priced like any other mid-priced restaurant, Meal for two between Rs. 600 to Rs. 800 range. But the outlets outside on the street are all in the very affordable category, dishes range from Rs. 50 – Rs. 75 on average, and I reckon one can have a royal feast for well under Rs. 200.

Going to Jama Masjid for food is always joyful, but being there during Ramzan, is unlike any regular experience. The positivity, jubilation and the merriment that is so prevalent, just multiplies the flavor of the food fiesta.